Home >> A week in Antigua Guatemala >> Guatemalan Food Sampling at La Cuevita de los Urquizu – ULTRA WIN!!!
Guatemalan Food Sampling at La Cuevita de los Urquizu – ULTRA WIN!!!

Guatemalan Food Sampling at La Cuevita de los Urquizu – ULTRA WIN!!!

So you’re busy and you don’t have time to visit all the Guatemalan food markets and stalls all around town, then I have an efficient and awesome idea for you. I will warn you, don’t attempt this idea, unless you can pull it off … head over to La Cuevita de los Urquizu (The Cave of the Urquizu Family) and chat up the lovely management there and tell them you’re planning a wedding and that you’re interested in tasting EVERYTHING!




Here are the basics, they’re open from 7am-7pm. Each pot/cauldron you see above has a different type of meat and all are typical Guatemalan dishes (typical but hard to find in restaurants). They will let you taste the stews before you order – just so you end up with something you won’t like. There is a pretty back garden as well where you can hear women in the back patting out tortillas and carrying out big bowls of guacamole and other stuff. Normal lunch for two and two beers ran us about 20$ USD.

Location – How to get there? La Cuevita de los Uriquizu is located in Antigua Guatemala on 2a Calle Oriente #9D. It is across the street from the famous Capuchinas Ruins, and about 4 blocks from Antigua’s Central Square or ask the locals! Just by the way … we’re getting married in those ruins … just sayin’

For me, I think that out of the Guatemalan cuisine restaurants I’ve seen La Cuevita de los Urquizu, is definitely a must seat at due to its good selection of “real” Guatemalan dishes, good service and decent facilities. Definitely worth a visit if you are curious in trying some local dishes in a Guatemalan environment (without having to eat on the street or local market). Their unique food display on the side of the street is worth a sneak peak and smell alone!

So now that I’ve gotten past the typical blog stuff … on to the food.



I needed all of my wide angle lens to capture the food on the table. The video above explains what a lot of the food and stews are … and to be fair, I’m not a fan of eating pig stomach or pig face or even lamb … although Diane liked the lamb.







Overall thoughts : They are really good about answering what each pot holds, even though the board states what’s in the bowls … however if you don’t speak Spanish, it won’t make sense 😛

There are quite a few of the stews and dishes include the classics such as pepian, hilachas, suban-ik, tiras de panza, chiles rellenos, adovado, revolcado. There’s carne asada, pierna horneada, pollo horneado, longanizas, chorizo. Some sides include: Ensalada Rusa, piloyada, Guatemalan guacamole, frijoles volteados curtido de remolacha. Desserts include: Plantanos en Gloria, plantanos en mole, molletes en miel, pan de banano

Other items posted on menu signs throughout the restaurant: panes con chile, pierna y frijole, tortillas con carne, enchaladas, Guatemalan tostadas, Guatemalan tacos, Guatemalan pupusas de chicharron, frijoles, queso y mixtas, ceviches y cocteles.

I put the qualifier “Guatemalan” in front of some of these items because they are totally different than the more familiar Mexican items. A Guatemalan taco, for example, is like a rolled Mexican flauta. A Guatemalan pupusa is much larger than the better known Salvadorian version.

Finally, if you’re looking for an excellent reference on all dishes by foodies who have nothing else better to do … then this is an excellent thread for your reference.